ca-tsuka:

Former Ghibli animator Hiroshi Shimizu will be the animation director of canadian “Urbance” TV series.
http://vimeo.com/109161510
But the project still need support on Kickstarter :
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2088672139/urbance

Time is running out to fund it!

(´ ▽`★) Sketched some of my OCs [who may make more appearances in the future] in Pokemon Kigurumis due to an outfit convo,
the meowtic and ursaring ocs belong to my friends

(´ ▽`★) Sketched some of my OCs [who may make more appearances in the future] in Pokemon Kigurumis due to an outfit convo,

the meowtic and ursaring ocs belong to my friends


Sam gets reacquainted with DA.

Sam gets reacquainted with DA.

Reblog if it is okay if I make fanart of your OCs

greekceltic:

customcoaster:

Knock yourself out, there’s plenty to choose from.

I actually find this information REALLY HELPFUL when I visit someone else’s gallery and like their OCs. Not everyone is comfortable with fanart and few artists post whether or not they are.

The handsome and melancholy 2nd tanuki son, Yajiro Shimogamo

I’m about halfway through the series and congrats on making me cry Yajiro that means I have to draw you

So today was a great day! I say that because I got to work on my first official set prop for the film crew. I did that before for a background piece but I was particularly excited because this is a sketchbook prop and these are two of the sketches I drew for it. When the head of our team told me what it was I was like, “ohhhh. OHHH. I get to be THAT person!” And by ‘that’ I mean a person who draws art that the actors interact with and is scripted as their own. I’m so excited like little dreams becoming reality right here.This counts for Inktober right, probably my only Inktober entry.

Something to cheer up a friend <3

Something to cheer up a friend <3

U talented so I follow you
Anonymous

Thank u cool person

image

carcinomas:

making ocs:image

making ocs with friends:

image

makiNG OCS WITH FRIENDS AND SHIPPING THEM TOGETHER:

image

I feel like Nishinoya would be a shirt burrower.

Every single one of these boys is a treasure and I can’t pick just one.

There’s not enough time in the day to draw everything I want to AGHHH.

I want to draw everyone and every ship from Haikyuu so bad but also my OCs too but I ALSO I need to FINISH THIS PROJECT I’m doing FIRST TOO AND *glitches across the pavement*

image

sleppu:

hey *leans against wall* wanna ship our ocs *slips and falls*

petitpotato:

Quick reminder, that we often try to catch up with some super artist that isn’t even real. You know, that one who can do absolutely anything, learnt it within a week, doesn’t need any sleep and is working on like a hundred successful projects at the same time. We’re being all sad and frustrated because we think we’re no good compared to that one super artist. But then, who is?

I wanted to draw them in some cute outfits I found ´ n `

I wanted to draw them in some cute outfits I found ´ n `

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.